Strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america. Strikebreaking and Intimidation by Stephen H. Norwood (ebook) 2019-03-24

Strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america Rating: 5,2/10 1179 reviews

Strikebreaking and Intimidation by Stephen H. Norwood

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Paradoxically, the country that pioneered the expansion of civil liberties allowed corporations to assemble private armies to disrupt union organizing, spy on workers, and break strikes. This is the first systematic study of strikebreaking, intimidation, and anti-unionism in the United States, subjects essential to a full understanding of labor's fortunes in the twentieth century. Through cases studies in mining and the automobile industry, Norwood demonstrates that trade unionists and their allies attacked strikebreakers on more than just class grounds--they made an argument about gender as well. Using a social-historical approach, Stephen Norwood focuses on the mercenaries the corporations enlisted in their anti-union efforts—particularly college students, African American men, the unemployed, and men associated with organized crime. He is no doubt correct, but he neglects to explain how his own story connects to that important shift. The book covers a wide range of industries across much of the country. The book covers a wide range of industries across much of the country.

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Strikebreaking and intimidation : mercenaries and masculinity in twentieth

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Retrieved Mar 20 2019 from By Stephen H. The book covers a wide range of industries across much of the country. Using a social-historical approach, Stephen Norwood focuses on the mercenaries the corporations enlisted in their anti-union efforts--particularly college students, African American men, the unemployed, and men associated with organized crime. There are two principal pivots around which Norwood's analysis turns. Contents: Introduction: The emergence of the anti-labor mercenary --The student as strikebreaker: College youth and the crisis of masculinity in the early twentieth century -- Gunfighters on the urban frontier: Strikebreakers in the car wars -- Forging a new masculinity: African American strikebreaking in the North in the early twentieth century -- Cossacks of the coal fields: Corporate mercenaries in the mine wars -- Ford's brass knuckles: Harry Bennett, the cult of muscularity, and anti-labor terror, 1920-1945 -- They shall not pass: Paramilitary combat against strikebreaking in the auto industry, 1933-1939 -- Epilogue: anti-unionism in America, 1945-2000. Its style and content make it an excellent reading for laymen wishing to familiarize themselves with the new labor history; Norwood's skillful treatment of the subject matter, theoretical consistency, and thorough research make it mandatory reading for all serious students of American labor history.

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Strikebreaking and Intimidation : Stephen H. Norwood : 9780807853733

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Unlike good union men, whose strikes against management stood for community betterment and upward mobility, labor mercenaries, union saboteurs, and company police exemplified a masculine individualism that threatened the social order. Norwood explores how the early twentieth-century crisis of masculinity shaped strikebreaking's appeal to elite youth and the media's romanticization of the strikebreaker as a new soldier of fortune. These contests involved both rhetorical salvos--the pen over the sword--and physical trials of fist and flesh and, far more consequentially, bullets and bombs. He examines how mining communities' perception of mercenaries as agents of a ribald, sexually unrestrained, new urban culture intensified labor conflict. Norwood's Strikebreaking and Intimidation is a wonderfully readable, evocative, and economical work of history. Strikebreaking and Intimidation: Mercenaries and Masculinity in Twentieth-Century America. Details: Master and use copy.

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Strikebreaking and Intimidation

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

The book covers a wide range of industries across much of the country. Norwood also considers the paramilitary methods unions developed to counter mercenary violence. Gender as a category of analysis disappears for almost the entire second half of the book--the part that focuses on mercenaries in mining and the auto industry. This is the first systematic study of strikebreaking, intimidation, and anti-unionism in the United States, subjects essential to a full understanding of labor's fortunes in the twentieth century. Norwood also considers the paramilitary methods unions developed to counter mercenary violence.

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Stephen H. Norwood: Strikebreaking and Intimidation (ePUB)

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Only two of the six chapters make masculinity a central analytical fulcrum; the other four make mention of it but do not explore it in any real depth. Norwood Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002. He examines how mining communities' perception of mercenaries as agents of a ribald, sexually unrestrained, new urban culture intensified labor conflict. Strikebreakers, in contrast, represented a kind of twisted and subversive manhood--men who lived outside of families and conventional morality and were likened to rapists and other sexual deviants. Paradoxically, the country that pioneered the expansion of civil liberties allowed corporations to assemble private armies to disrupt union organizing, spy on workers, and break strikes. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1.

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Strikebreaking and Intimidation by Stephen H. Norwood ¡ OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Using a social-historical approach, Stephen Norwood focuses on the mercenaries the corporations enlisted in their anti-union efforts--particularly college students, African American men, the unemployed, and men associated with organized crime. This is the first systematic study of strikebreaking, intimidation, and anti-unionism in the United States, subjects essential to a full understanding of labor's fortunes in the twentieth century. This is the first systematic study of strikebreaking, intimidation, and anti-unionism in the United States, subjects essential to a full understanding of labor's fortunes in the twentieth century. Series Title: Other Titles: Strikebreaking and intimidation Responsibility: Stephen H. This is especially true in the chapter on African Americans.

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Strikebreaking and Intimidation

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Norwood also considers the paramilitary methods unions developed to counter mercenary violence. The book also traces the economic restructuring which transformed corporate anti-unionism. Norwood explores how the early twentieth-century crisis of masculinity shaped strikebreaking's appeal to elite youth and the media's romanticization of the strikebreaker as a new soldier of fortune. That said, Norwood has not quite written an effective book about masculinity. The twentieth-century's long history of anti-unionism, Norwood suggests, opens up an equally compelling history of American manhood.

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Strikebreaking and Intimidation: Mercenaries and Masculinity in Twentieth ...

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Paradoxically, the country that pioneered the expansion of civil liberties allowed corporations to assemble private armies to disrupt union organizing, spy on workers, and break strikes. Importantly, Strike-breaking and Intimidation reminds us of things that should not be forgotten--the intensity and unrelenting nature of class struggle, the power of capital and the fortitude of working people and their families. He examines how mining communities' perception of mercenaries as agents of a ribald, sexually unrestrained, new urban culture intensified labor conflict. He examines how mining communities' perception of mercenaries as agents of a ribald, sexually unrestrained, new urban culture intensified labor conflict. His treatment of the bitter Chicago teamster and meatpacking strikes of 1904-1905 adds much to the existing literature on those events. Strikebreaking in the first three decades of the twentieth century, Norwood argues, was not merely or only an instance of class conflict. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.

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Strikebreaking and Intimidation: Mercenaries and Masculinity in Twentieth

strikebreaking and intimidation mercenaries and masculinity in twentiethcentury america

Using a social-historical approach, Stephen Norwood focuses on the mercenaries the corporations enlisted in their anti-union efforts - particularly college students, African American men, the unemployed, and men associated with organized crime. Furthermore, other than in the chapter on college students my favorite , it is often difficult to determine precisely what cultural work was being done by strikebreakers, as opposed to their socio-economic work of undermining unionism. The book also traces the economic restructuring which transformed corporate anti-unionism. The E-mail message field is required. Overall, the most glaring weakness of the sections of masculinity is that Norwood does not link his own claims to any clear process of historical change. It was also an exceedingly important social and cultural terrain for the production of masculinity--and for conflicts over the proper form and content of masculine behavior.

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