Grace hopper and the invention of the information age. Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age by Kurt W. Beyer 2019-01-25

Grace hopper and the invention of the information age Rating: 6,4/10 487 reviews

Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

The book seemed well cited and as far as I could tell, the author fairly gave Hopper credit where it was due and also made clear where someone else deserved credit and where attribution of credit for an idea is still contentious. She works hard to succeed in the all-male computer industry, is almost brought down by per A Hollywood biopic about the life of computer pioneer Grace Murray Hopper 1906--1992 would go like this: a young professor abandons the ivy-covered walls of academia to serve her country in the Navy after Pearl Harbor and finds herself on the front lines of the computer revolution. I have to say it wasn't quite what I expected. I really liked this book. It was a serviceable intro to the very beginning of the industry.

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Grace Hopper & the Invention of the Information Age

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

Navy, where Hopper would spend many of her future years, retiring officially in 1967 as a Rear Admiral. The text concludes on page 324. Weiss is an award-winning technology journalist and freelance writer who worked as a staff reporter for Computerworld. I thought it was an interesting and educational look at the factors that enabled her to have such an incredibly successful career. In 1944, she was commissioned as a Lieutenant Junior Grade and assigned to the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard University. It's dry as toast and if you're interested in Grace as a woman, this isn't the place. Grace Hopper was a pioneer computer scientist before such a profession ever existed.

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Grace Hopper and the invention of the information age (Book, 2009) [tooluser.org]

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

Brought up in comfortable surroundings in Manhattan and schooled at Vassar, Hopper brought her sharp intellect, organizational powers and unrelenting drive to her work. Along the way the author successfully weaves many stories of the people involved while charting the development of the hardware and the technology and the corporate structure associated with it. Although Hopper had many career accomplishments, she later told her biographer, her greatest joy came from teaching. I think that's probably why I was attracted to telling the story of one of the feminine heroes of the 20th century who hadn't gotten her due. In Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age, Kurt Beyer reveals a more authentic Hopper, a vibrant and complex woman whose career paralleled the meteoric trajectory of the postwar computer industry. Lemelson Center Studies in Invention and Innovation. I ended up skipping the introduction and jumping right into it instead.

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Staff View: Grace Hopper and the invention of the information age /

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

Perhaps that wasn't the point of this book but I was disappointed. Naval Academy, says she influenced his own career choices first as a naval officer, then as an academic, and finally as an entrepreneur. She really was an amazing individual with an incredible amount of dedication and skill. It is presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors. The author tells us not only about the inventor of compilers and the driving force behind standardized computer languages, but also about the person behind it, with the excitement, fights, and disappointments of being a leader in some Very important for anyone interested in the history of one of the most important technologies of our age! The writing could also have been more engaging. The author ends the book on a good note highlighting Hopper's exceptional qualities and capabilities. In taking everything from physics to astronomy to economics, Hopper broadened her own intellectual world while also incorporating what she learned back into her teaching.

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[PDF] grace hopper and the invention of the information age Download ~ Online

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

He spends his spare time working on a book about an unheralded member of the 1957 Milwaukee Braves and watching classic Humphrey Bogart movies. He tells us that she was an alcoholic, but does not go into the possible origins of her disease nor does he discuss how she overcame it or, actually, if sh every really did. Her career with computers took her from academia to the military to businesses large and small and back again—a matrix of destinations that would become familiar to many of those who entered the field after her. Hopper's greatest technical achievement was to create the tools that would allow humans to communicate with computers in terms other than ones and zeroes. The programming environment was pretty minimal: a program was put in as a punched paper tape, with the holes in the tape setting machine switches for each instruction. He said that when Hopper came to speak at the Naval Academy, she was there to set up an educational program to bring the next generation of officers up to speed on new computer technologies in the Navy.

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Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

Cover image courtesy of Library of Congress. This book is very readable despite its technical topic. Later chapters in the book cover the post-war period and Grace Hoppers years with the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation, its merger with Remington Rand, later becoming Sperry Rand. Beyer's account of Grace Hopper's life was very interesting once you can get past the opening chapters Beyer writes about himself. Later, she enrolled at Vassar College. While working at Remington Rand later Sperry Rand , Hopper began to confront the formidable and interconnected problems of the time-consuming nature of programming and a still-low number of people entering the highly specialized field of computing.

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Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

I'm already excited for next year just so I can do more with this event! It certainly makes more sense now that she was able to think so innovatively. Like I said, last 20% of the book is notes and references. When Hopper finally retired from the Navy in 1990, she had earned the rank of Rear Admiral. The title is a bit misleading, however. Her goal was to create automated programming using real words that real people could understand.

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Grace Hopper and the invention of the information age (Book, 2009) [tooluser.org]

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

He was awestruck by Hopper's speech, he said in a telephone interview. At times some of the material was even a bit dry for me, and I'm a geek a tr I've long admired Grace Hopper but was relieved to read this biography in particular. When the first modern computers were being developed in the 1940s, however, it was not at all clear just what kind of information these new machines ultimately would be able to create. She invented the modern compiler, which takes written text and transforms it into the code that can be run on computers. Think giant machines with movable parts and connections that were changed by hand for each function. A comprehensive Subject Index, Category Index and Ethnicity Index can be found at the end of Volume 3. I'm already excited for next year just so I can do more with this event! More than that, though, Grace Hopper invented the compiler, a way of communicating with a computer that didn't rely on an intimate understanding of both mathematics, and the machine's hardware to obtain results.

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Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age by Kurt W Beyer

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

It's a shock to realize that nothing existed--not even the terminology. Beyer tells us that Grace Hopper was a mathematics professor who left her husband to apply her skills to the war effort, but never tells us if she ever went on a date again. Can't quite put my finger on why I didn't love this book. It's remarkable to realize that its creators had widely different views of its future. I read the Kindle edition of the book and like many Kindle books, it seems to have been scanned and run through optical character recognition.

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Grace Hopper and the Invention of the Information Age

grace hopper and the invention of the information age

Babb Computer pioneer Grace Hopper is famous for what she created—Google honored her achievements in 2013—but she also should be remembered for how she did it. New York: Rosen Publishing Group, 2003. Computers and other corresponding technologies are relatively new inventions, but they have greatly influenced the way modern societies operate. This engaging volume introduces readers to the titans of the technology industry, including Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg, among many others. It occasionally deals with her challenges as a woman, but the bulk of the book is the history of computing. Hopper wrote a 500-page Manual of Operations for the Automatic Sequence-Controlled Calculator in which she outlined the fundamental operating principles of computing machines. Beyer is a former professor at the United States Naval Academy and lectures regularly on the process of technological innovation.

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